Rationale

In recent years, the discovery of ~ one billion solar mass quasars at redshifts of 6–7 has lent ever greater relevancy to the understanding of supermassive stellar evolution. Mounting observational and theoretical evidence points to such stars being the most viable progenitor model for such early, massive accreting black holes. An observational candidate for an immediate descendant of the direct collapse of a supermassive star has now been found in the object CR7. The launch of the James Webb Space Telescope next year promises to finally unveil many more such sources, and supermassive stars themselves — but we must know precisely what to look for! The potential for exotic nucleosynthesis during the collapse of supermassive stars, and in particular the ejection of this matter into the interstellar and intergalactic medium, remains poorly understood.

This workshop will assemble leading experts from stellar evolution, star formation, accretion physics, and cosmology, in order to shed new light on the origin, evolution, and collapse of supermassive stars, as well as their life after death as the progenitors of the first massive quasars. The primary objective will be to review, discuss, and bring together the latest developments in the study of primordial supermassive stars and their cosmological context. New insight is needed into the coupling of the evolution of these stars to the surrounding gas, the onset of their collapse to a black hole, the role of previously neglected physical processes for their evolution, such as rotation and magnetic fields, and more.

Workshop Topics

  • Accretion physics in massive, atomically-cooled halos
  • Star formation in the early Universe
  • Direct collapse black holes and the origin of the first quasars
  • Gravitational waves from collapsing supermassive stars
  • Mass return and chemical enrichment from supermassive stars
  • Recent observational evidence for supermassive stars
  • Intermediate mass black holes
  • Observational prospects in the era of the James Webb Space Telescope
  • Expected rates from cosmological simulations
  • Exotic nucleosynthesis during the collapse of supermassive stars

Scientific Organizing Committee

* = co-chair

Volker Bromm

Volker Bromm

UT Austin

Lionel Haemmerle

Lionel Haemmerlé*

U Geneva

Zoltan Haiman

Zoltán Haiman

Columbia U

Alexander Heger

Alexander Heger*

Monash U

Ralf Klessen

Ralf Klessen*

U Heidelberg

Yuexing Li

Yuexing Li

Penn State U

Priyamvada Natarajan

Priyamvada Natarajan

Yale U

Stefania Salvadori

Stefania Salvadori

U Florence

Raffaella Schneider

Raffaella Schneider

Rome Observatory

Marta Volonteri

Marta Volonteri

IAP

Daniel Whalen

Daniel Whalen

U Portsmouth

Tyrone Woods

Tyrone E. Woods*

Monash U

Naoki Yoshida

Naoki Yoshida

U Tokyo

If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Program

The workshop will be held from 20–24 November 2017. The final program is as follows:

Monday, November 20

How do supermassive stars form? Do they?

09:00

Introduction by the co-chairs

09:30

Kohei Inayoshi: Theory of SMS/DCBH formation

10:00

Muhammad Latif: Numerical simulations of SMS formation

10:30

Coffee

11:00

John Regan: SMBH formation in atomically-cooled halos

11:30

Simon Glover: Microphysics of SMBH formation

12:00

Lunch

14:00

Fabio Pacucci: Feedback limits

14:30

Shingo Hirano: Supersonic gas streams enhance the formation of massive black holes in the early Universe

14:50

Unconference/Breakout session(s)

16:00

Coffee

16:30

Whiteboard discussion

17:30

Break

Tuesday, November 21

How do supermassive stars live and die?

09:00

Takashi Hosokawa: The evolution of supermassive stars

09:30

Tyrone Woods: The death of supermassive stars

10:00

Lionel Haemmerlé: Rotating models and the angular momentum problem

10:30

Coffee

11:00

Yuya Sakurai: UV feedback in the formation of SMSs

11:30

Rafaella Schneider: The rise of the first SMBHs from BH seeds: light or heavy?

12:00

Lunch

14:00

Ken Chen: Unusual death of supermassive Pop III stars

14:20

Unconference/Breakout session(s)

15:30

Coffee

16:00

Whiteboard discussion

17:00

Break

Wednesday, November 22

Rates and the Rees diagram

09:00

Bhaskar Agarwal: Uncertainties in the rate of SMS formation

09:30

Yuexing Li: Long-term accretion/evolution of central SMBHs

10:00

Sunmyon Chon: Radiation hydrodynamics simulations of the SMS formation

10:20

Coffee

10:50

Unconference/Breakout session(s)

12:00

Whiteboard discussion

13:00

Lunch
FREE AFTERNOON

Thursday, November 23

Observations past and future

09:00

Tilman Hartwig: What is CR7?

09:30

Mar Mezcua: Observational constraints from IMBHs

10:00

Filippos Koliopanos: In search of intermediate mass black holes in low luminosity AGN

10:20

Andrew Bunker: Upcoming insights from JWST

10:50

Coffee

11:20

Stefania Salvadori: Local constraints on the high-z Universe

11:50

Chiaki Kobayashi: Constraints from chemical evolution

12:20

Lunch

14:00

Lucio Mayer: Disk accretion onto central SMBHs

14:30

Yuexing Li: Observing the first black holes with next-generation observatories

14:50

Unconference/Breakout session(s)

16:00

Coffee

16:30

Whiteboard discussion

17:30

Break

Friday, November 24

How will we know when we’ve found a SMS? Will we soon? What needs to be done?

09:00

Conference summary by the co-chairs

09:30

Breakout sessions: Workshop on white paper sections

10:30

Coffee

11:00

Sectional summaries (by day/topic) & dissenting opinions

12:00

Lunch

14:00

Break

Participants

Bhaskar Agarwal

U Heidelberg

Andrew Bunker

U Oxford

Ken Chen

NAOJ Tokyo

Sunmyon Chon

U Tokyo

Simon Glover

U Heidelberg

Lionel Haemmerlé

U Geneva

Tilman Hartwig

U Tokyo

Alexander Heger

Monash U

Shingo Hirano

UT Austin

Takashi Hosokawa

Kyoto U

Kohei Inayoshi

Columbia U

Ralf Klessen

U Heidelberg

Chiaki Kobayashi

U Hertfordshire

Filippos Koliopanos

IRAP Toulouse

Muhammad Latif

CIIT Islamabad

Yuexing Li

Penn State U

Lucio Mayer

U Zurich

Mar Mezcua

IEEC-CSIC Barcelona

Fabio Pacucci

Yale U

John Regan

Dublin City U

Yuya Sakurai

U Tokyo

Stefania Salvadori

U Florence

Raffaella Schneider

Rome Observatory

Daniel Whalen

U Portsmouth

Tyrone E. Woods

Monash U

Venue

The workshop will be held at the Monash University Prato Centre in Prato, Italy.

Resources

Monash University Prato Centre
Palazzo Vai
Via Pugliesi, 26
59100 Prato (PO)
ITALY

Tel: +39 0574 43691
Email: info@monash.it

Sponsors

Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics - Center for the Evolution of the Elements
European Research Council
Monash University

Code of Conduct

By attending this workshop, participants agree to follow the JINA-CEE Code of Conduct. Any participant who wishes to report a violation of this policy is encouraged to speak to Raffaella Schneider or Tyrone Woods, as they have agreed to serve as a point of contact (or if desired, to another member of the organizing team).

Credits

Background illustration by NASA/Dana Berry/SkyWorks Digital. Website and poster design by Cheryl Woynarski.